Menu
×
News
Get Involved
About Us
Our Members
HERB SALES UP 35 PERCENT IN MASS MARKET.
ISSUE:
Page:
66
Sales of herbal supplements rose dramatically in drugstores and supermarkets in 1994. According to a report by Towne-Oller, a division of Information Resources, Inc. of New York, herbs were one of the top 10 dollar gainers in the mass market compared to 1993 sales, with a 32% sales increase in drugstores totaling $74.7 million and 41% growth in food stores to $31.9 million. The average growth for both outlets was 35%, totaling $106.7 million in retail sales.

As in 1993, garlic and ginseng dominated the herb category in 1994. Ginseng sales rose to $31.1 million, up 28% from the previous year in drugstores, while garlic sales increased 20% to $26.5 million. Garlic sales grew 40% to $12.9 million in food stores while ginseng leaped 63% to $11.8 million in retail sales.

According to the report, acidophilus was the quickest growing "herbal supplement" in drugstores, skyrocketing 140% to $1.2 million, while food store sales increased 57% to over $475,000. This constitutes a 1.6% dollar share in the herb category in drugstores; 1.5% in food stores. Acidophilus is a beneficial bacteria consumed to help restore proper balance of intestinal flora. Although it is classed as an herbal supplement in this report, few herb experts consider acidophilus an "herb"; it most properly should be classed as a miscellaneous dietary supplement.

The study also included lecithin, bee pollen, and brewer's yeast in the herb class. Lecithin, derived from soy beans, is usually not considered "herbal" -- at least in the traditional herb industry. Bee pollen, gathered from flowers by honeybees and then harvested from hives by beekeepers, is often sold by herb companies.

Sources:

Herbal Supplement Sales Grow 35% in 1994. The Tan Sheet. Chevy Chase, MD. F-D-C Reports, April 10, 1995.

Highlights & Trends of Health & Beauty Care -- 1994, Towne-Oller, a Subsidiary of Information Resources, Inc.

Article copyright American Botanical Council.